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Keynote Speakers

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Inside International Standards: A Contributor's Perspective

International standards such as those supported by organizations like the ISO generally have a poor reputation with certain sections of academia and industry. Whilst there may be many publicised business advantages of using standards, standardization is an often-neglected route for exploiting academic and commercial research. Often researchers have little or no experience of standardization to plan, implement and exploit their research utilizing standards, and therefore trying to achieve the maximum potential from their research endeavours. Involvement of standards development organisations in your research ensures international recognition, since clearly the international community regards the work sufficiently highly to invest in writing standards based upon your research. Recognition in this way has the potential to highlight in a world stage your research and enhance your international reputation.

As part of this keynote address, I will examine issues such as: the benefits of standards for industry and academia, the benefits of being directly involved in the standards community for both industry and academia and specifically how standards can inform your research. Based upon personal experience as Ireland head of delegation to the ISO (ISO/IEC JC1/SC7) and that of editor of ISO/IEC 29110-2, I will examine the issues and benefits of becoming actively involved inside the standardization community and how this can be translated into research.

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Dr. Rory V. O'Connor is a Senior Lecturer Computing at Dublin City University (Ireland) and a Senior Researcher with Lero, The Irish Software Engineering Research Centre. He is also Ireland's Head of Delegation to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO/IEC JTC1/SC7), which manages Software & Systems Engineering standards and an also editor of ISO/IEC 29110-2 Lifecycle Profiles for Very Small Enterprises. Rory’s research interests are centred on researching methods, techniques, tools and standards for supporting the work of software project managers and software developers in relation to software process, process improvement, and the management of software development projects.

Rory V. O'Connor

 
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Mehmet Akşit

Gummy Modules for Coping with Emergent Behaviour

The term emergence in software is defined as the appearance of complex behaviour out of multiplicity of relatively simple interactions. In the design of navigation systems, weather forecasting systems, pollution monitoring systems, stock market management systems, for example, software engineers typically deal with certain kind of emergent behaviour. Software systems that deal with emergent behaviour are in general complex, exhibit dynamic behaviour, and are typically designed to be long-lived. These characteristics demand proper modularization of such software systems. Unfortunately, current module-based, object-oriented and aspect-oriented languages lack language abstractions to represent emergent behaviour satisfactorily. In this talk, with the help of some real world examples, emergent behaviour will be defined. Second, current languages and their shortcomings will be illustrated. To overcome their limitations, new language abstractions, called gummy Modules will be introduced. Gummy Modules assume events (state-changes) as the bases for modularization. They are more expressive than current aspect-oriented languages because they explicitly abstract and encapsulate appearance and disappearance of emergent behaviour. Finally, this talk will end with some example applications of Gummy Modules.

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Mehmet Aksit (Akşit) is the head of the Twente Research and Education on Software Engineering (TRESE) and a full professor at the Department of Computer Science, University of Twente. He is the co-founder of Aspect-oriented association, where he has served as the steering committee member until March 2008. He is the steering committee member of AITO, which organizes the ECOOP conference series. He has served many conferences and symposia and given numerous invited presentations and keynote talks. Since 1990, he has given more than 110 international and in-company courses and conference tutorials in several countries including the Netherlands, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey and United States. He has organized special training programs for a number of multi-national companies, where he trained hundreds of software designers and architects.

DSD/SEAA Keynote

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Ian Phillips

Ian is Principal Staff Engineer at ARM Ltd of Cambridge, where his role is to nurture strategic technologies and opportunities until their business value can be quantified. He was an MOD apprentice in electronics from 1965-69 and graduated from University of Wales - Swansea, in 1975.
He worked for Pye-TMC, Philips, Plessey, GEC and Mitel before joining ARM in 1998.

As an electronic designer he gained wide experience of design and manufacture as the microelectronic/ microelectronic system technologies evolved through this most exhilarating period.
His role is very outward facing and he is involved with many European Research Universities, Institutions and Government Bodies, as both advisor and technology scout.

He is a frequent presenter on European stages; an advocate of improved University/Industry relationships; Visiting Professor at the Universities of Liverpool and Plymouth; and the winner of the 2008 NMI award for his personal Contribution to Industry.


Keynote:

Computing Platforms for the XXI Century

Wikipedia define Platform as "A raised level surface on which people or things can stand". A more familiar technical interpretation applies to the hardware and OS configuration applicable to the execution of software; most frequently applicable to highly stable PC or Mainframe architectures.

But the world has changed a lot since serious computing power moved into the embedded consumer arena. Now, with runs of many millions for single products, the argument for customisation is much more justifiable; so the traditional view of platforms is struggling against a tide of individuality.

Can the ARM architecture bring stability back into this chaos, or is something else needed?

Isaac Newton realised the reality of platforms when he talked of standing on the shoulders of giants. A platform is a stable place where engineers and scientists can stand to achieve more than they would otherwise have done. So our XXI Century Platforms are the shape to deliver improved Productivity, Reuse, Quality, TTM, Cost, etc. for the System Products we are now charged to deliver. Its business, stupid!